Daily Plus 2014-04-16

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shared on Google Plus on 2012-03-15 13:27:30 by

Chris Robinson

A third of food - enough for billions of people - is wasted while over 15 million people die of starvation each yeargoo.gl/qnWTV.  It takes 2% of the global military spending to eliminate hunger by less waste. More info at ► www.wfp.org/share-a-hunger-fact.  Hopefully Putin's future actions in Ukraine will not lead to increasing military spending worldwide, since that will make it harder to solve hunger...   That's why more world peace meditation will help ► https://plus.google.com/+AlexP/posts/HqQeqD1W5Sj.  Ukraine used to have world's third largest stock of nuclear weapons and they agreed to give it up in 1994 for the sake of WORLD PEACE♥ in exchange for a treaty that said their borders are guaranteed by Russia, Britain and USA.  Hopefully the world will inspire Putin to honor the Ukraine borders, so that other nations will want to follow Ukraine example of nuclear non-proliferation.  Russia has 40 times more land per capita than Japan/India, 7 times more land per capita than the world average, more land per capita than 223  countries ► http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sovereign_states_and_dependent_territories_by_population_density and 9 times more land per capita than Ukraine, so maybe this will help Russians to see things from the world's point of view.
Alex P Alex P

The World Health Organization says alcohol kills 2.5 million people a year ►   http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/facts/alcohol/en/index.html.  Many more millions are crippled by alcohol. 

Alcohol disrupts the growth of new brain cells and lowers IQhttp://www.pnas.org/content/early/2010/05/20/0912810107.full.pdf.  See also ► http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2861155/. Human studies have found alcoholics to have a smaller brain size than moderate drinkershttp://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh314/377-388.htm.

The anti-oxidants in wine are negligible - so there is no health benefit in drinking any amount.  The ORAC values show the amount of anti-oxidants (that neutralize free radicals) in food.  Most foods have 8-800  times more anti-oxidants per 100 g than white wine (ORAC value 392 at the bottom of the list) ► http://www.phytochemicals.info/list-orac-values.php.  

 1.2 million people die every year on Earth in car accidents.  In some countries about 70%  of fatally injured drivers have excess alcohol in their bloodhttp://www.who.int/roadsafety/projects/manuals/alcohol/en/

Alcohol raises blood pressure and can trigger epilepsy, mental disorders, cardiovascular disease, cirrhosis of the liver and various cancers. Alcohol weakens the immune system and impairs the brain even in rather small amounts.  It causes millions of fatal road traffic accidents, cases of domestic and workplace  violence, suicides.  

It's interesting that ending global hunger takes 30% of the 100 billion dollars Americans spend on alcohol.  Also, over 50 nations drink even more alcohol per capita than Americans according to the World Health Organization report ► http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/publications/global_alcohol_report/msbgsruprofiles.pdf summarized in wikipedia ► http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_alcohol_consumption.  

Russian males drink more alcohol than almost anyone.  Twenty-five percent of Russian men die before age 55, the average life expectancy for Russian men is age 64, not 79 as in Western Europe ►  http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2014/01/31/Twenty-five-percent-of-Russian-men-die-before-the-age-of-55/UPI-53201391229919/  

 40% of violent crime is done by those under the influence of alcohol in the US ► http://www.ncadd.org/index.php/learn-about-alcohol/alcohol-and-crime.  I hope that lovers of world peace and non-violence are aware of these numbers.

13% of humanity goes hungry and millions die of hunger every year, while a third of food is wasted ► goo.gl/qnWTV.  30 billion dollars could prevent this waste of food per some studies.  The money spent on alcohol could end hunger, cure a disease (instead of causing diseases), provide clean energy, help some other humanitarian cause.  That's why I abstained all my life from alcohol.  In over 100 nations, 7-40% of people abstained from alcohol all their life.  (USA data ► http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/drinking-statistics).  Compassion ♥ for humanity can help us to quickly shift these lifelong abstainers percentages in the 90s for all these 100+ nations. :)  Nikola Tesla (whose inventions are in every building with electricity) predicted one day we will live without eating or drinking liquids, using just cosmic energy ► https://plus.google.com/+AlexP/posts/URSW7eeNhhf.  :)  I can't wait. :)  

The Seventh Day Adventists from Loma Linda, USA are the longest living group of people in North America, and they do not drink alcohol ► http://www.bluezones.com/live-longer/education/expeditions/loma-linda-california.  The centenarians of Loma Linda do not drink at all - proving that you don't need any alcohol to live far longer than the average moderate drinker.   

One thing few know is that a lot of celebrities don't drink ►  http://rollingout.com/entertainment/celebrities-dont-drink. 
Alex P Alex P

Rich Pollett - ; )
+132 - 29 shares - 4 comments


; )
Rich Pollett Rich Pollett

Help Me Obi Wan

I'm looking for more ideas for astronomy/astrophysics posts, so if you have topics you'd like to see, let me know.  Particularly if there are basic concepts you'd like to see explained.
Brian Koberlein Brian Koberlein

I'll just leave this here.
#humanism  
Filippo Salustri Filippo Salustri

mary Zeman - #crochet  LOL
+47 - 5 shares - 3 comments

#crochet  LOL
mary Zeman mary Zeman

Here's a great timelapse video of the lunar eclipse

You know me, I'm a total sucker for timelapses. Here's a video by the amazing +Maxwell Palau of the recent lunar eclipse which he captured from a dark sky location in California. 

You can see how the moon gets chomped by the shadow and then turns red when it's completely covered by the Earth's shadow.

I was in flight when the eclipse began, but I was able to see most of it once I landed.

Did you get a chance to see the eclipse? 
Fraser Cain Fraser Cain

▪■Image Description:
This electron micrograph depicts an amoeba, Hartmannella vermiformis (orange), as it entraps a Legionella pneumophila bacterium (green) with an extended pseudopod. After it is ingested, the Legionella pneumophila bacterium can survive as a symbiont within what then becomes its protozoan host. The amoeba then becomes what is referred to as a "Trojan horse," for by harboring the pathogenic bacteria, the amoeba can afford them protection, and in fact, in times of adverse environmental conditions, are able to metamorphose into a cystic-stage enabling it, and its symbiotic resident pathogens to withstand such environmental stresses.

Image credit: Dr. Barry S Fields/CDC

Legionella pneumophila bacterium causes a disease called Legionellosis, that can come in two forms:

1) Legionnaires' disease is the more severe form of the infection, which may involve pneumonia.

2) Pontiac fever is a milder illness that develops from hours to two days after initial infection and resolves spontaneously. ( http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/mobileart.asp?articlekey=10790&page=1 )
#science #biology
Derya Unutmaz Derya Unutmaz

Ovulation is the part of the menstrual cycle where the ovary releases an egg to be fertilized during conception, or sloughed off during a woman's period. Ovulation must take place in order for a woman to get pregnant, preceding the meeting of the male sperm during fertilization.

This 3D medical animation depicts in exquisite detail: follicle development within the ovary, the movement of the fimbriae over the ovulation site before ovulation, the bursting of the egg from the ovary in a rush of fluid, delicate quality of the ciliated fimbriae and its movement to pick up the egg after ovulation, peristalsis of the fallopian tube to move the egg toward the uterus. 
Derya Unutmaz Derya Unutmaz

One of the interesting things about radiometric dating is that we can do astronomy with it.  In this case, a rise of carbon-14 in the past can be connected to solar flare activity.
Brian Koberlein Brian Koberlein

Getting plants to grow in space

Being able to get plants to grow in the harsh environment of microgravity will be one of the biggest challenges to human spaceflight. If scientists can get the biology right, we'll have air, clean water, and food. We'll be able to travel further and last longer.

But low gravity does crazy things to plants. Here's a cool video from the +European Space Agency, ESA on what's involved.

I'd love to be a space gardener. :-)
Fraser Cain Fraser Cain

Photo of a phenomenal anticline-syncline pair from Vermont, with vertical bedding in the center.  

Someone needs to +Gigapan this thing, if it hasn't already been done!  +Ron Schott ?  

Pic by Matt Manon (Union College).  
Charles Carrigan Charles Carrigan

Amazing interview with the creator of the nuclear navy.
It does raise a big question:
Can someone get great things done without being a dick, in an imperfect world? 
Pascal Wallisch Pascal Wallisch

Seen on the Facebook Astronomers group, posted by +Eugenio Schisano
Brad Snowder Brad Snowder

Today in History: First Female Pilot Flies Across English Channel
On April 16, 1912 — 102 years ago today — Harriet Quimby took off from Dover, England and flew 59 minutes, about 25 miles, and landed on a beach in Hardelot-Plage, Pas-de-Calais, France. Quimby convinced Louis Bleriot to lend her a 50-horsepower monoplane for the attempt. According to a PBS description of the event, “...most everyone around her was convinced she would fail. Even her friend and instructor, Gustav Hamel, offered to disguise himself in her purple suit, fly the plane in her place, and then secretly switch places with her on the French shores. But Quimby refused.”

Interestingly, Quimby was not only the first woman pilot to be licensed to fly in the United States, but she was also one of the first female screenwriters, as several of her scripts were made into films.

While participating in the Third Annual Boston Aviation Meet at Squantum, Massachusetts, Quimby’s plan unexpectedly pitched forward at an altitude of about 1,500 feet and she was ejected from the plan and fell to her death. Harriet was 37 at the time of her death.

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Quimby
http://www.pbs.org/kcet/chasingthesun/innovators/hquimby.html

Photo credits:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Harriet_quimby.jpg
•Google Maps
Brad Acker Brad Acker

So, Sunday means the in-laws come over for Easter dinner.  This year my MIL won't be there as she is back in the nursing home rehab for another week or so.  That will be a little awkward.... Anyways. I have lost my mojo for planning fun and interesting dinners.  I've let this Easter turn into a random assortment of pot luck and whatever is already pre-made at the store.  If they are lucky we won't use paper plates!  
Do you have any fun family dinner traditions? (Easter or Passover?)
I used to make the braided Easter bread from scratch, a lamb shaped cake, fancy tablescapes, all the food from fresh but the ham... and used the fancy dishes.  Maybe next year.....
mary Zeman mary Zeman

During the Pleistocene, there were two ice sheets present in North America, the Cordillera and Laurentide sheets. It has long been presumed that the corridor between the two ice sheets opened and closed repeatedly during the Pleistocene. This ice free corridor was presumed to have opened around 13,000 years ago, allowing humans to travel down the corridor and enter North America. This model was associated with the idea that the initial settlement of the New World was done by the Clovis People. But, over the last 20 years, it has become clear that humans were in the New World prior to 13,000 years ago, which brings up the question of how they got here. Geologists went back up to Alberta to study the evidence for ice free corridor, using new dating techniques. 

The researchers concluded that the corridor was ice-free during most of the Pleistocene, with the  corridor only closing during around 20,000 years ago. But, the corridor also did not reopen until after 13,000 years ago. 

I'm not sure why people are so skeptical about a coastal route during the period between 20,000 and 13,000 years ago. Boat technology was clearly developed enough by that time period. The argument I heard as an undergrad was that the water was too cold, and if you fell into it, you would instantly be killed. But, water can't get below 32 F (0 C). It is physically impossible (if the water temperature drops below that, it becomes ice). And, I can't imagine it would have been any more of hazard than it is for Eskimos. The available evidence (archaeological, genetic and linguistic) I've seen seems to suggest that the first migrants into the Americas spread rapidly down the west coast. This would be consistent with a coastal migration.
Jeff Baker Jeff Baker

NASA's Cassini spacecraft took these images of Saturn's Rings on the 13th-14th April 2014. I've assembled them into this gif image so we can see the dynamic F Ring being shaped by it's shepherd moon Prometheus.
Credit:= NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Fraser Cain Fraser Cain

Study indicates Robots could replace 80% of Jobs

In a few decades, twenty or thirty years — or sooner – robots and their associated technology will be as ubiquitous as mobile phones are today, at least that is the prediction of Bill Gates; and we would be hard-pressed to find a roboticist, automation expert or economist who could present a strong case against this. The Robotics Revolution promises a host of benefits that are compelling (especially in health care) and imaginative, but it may also come at a significant price.
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

Look closer..........There is a woman in there.  I didn't even notice  this picture was a body painting initially.  Wow, such creativity.  Read the article in the Huffington Post here: http://goo.gl/9jVRSh
#bodypainting  
Ciro Villa Ciro Villa


Stopping Sound with Foam

Experiments with this foam (shown under a microscope) showed that at certain frequencies, the bubbles and the surrounding liquid vibrate out of synch in response to an ultrasound wave, completely suppressing the transmission of sound.

APS physics:http://physics.aps.org/articles/v7/37

Paper: Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 148307 (2014):
http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.148307

Image: V. Leroy/Univ. of Paris-Diderot
.

#physics #chemistry #micrograph #appliedphysics  
Rich Pollett Rich Pollett

LYMErix, a promising vaccine for Lyme disease introduced in the ‘90s, was taken off the market due to pushback from superstitious anti-vaxxers (among other groups). Is it time to bring the drug back?

The vaccine appeared to prevent about 80% of cases of Lyme, a remarkable achievement, and the FDA—so often criticized for moving with feet of lead—this time acted quickly to approval based on one-year follow-up. The vaccine, which required a several-shot series, was OK’ed with some fanfare and optimism in late 1998.

“Despite its inviting, assuring name, which makes it sound more like a breakfast cereal than a disease, the Heartland Virus causes very unpleasant symptoms including aches and fever and fatigue that last far too long.”

Moving even faster though, in December 1999, a class action suit was filed against the manufacturers of LYMErix™ on the basis of apparent vaccine-induced arthritis. Anti-vaccine sentiment, always present, suddenly had found a winner—a disease (Lyme) that affected people in the areas surrounding the media center of the universe, New York City. At warp speed, Lyme vaccine victims and sad-sack tales abounded on the evening news, the morning paper, and the then-fledgling World Wide Web. 

The coup was swift and bloodless. The LYMErix™ manufacturer quickly gave up and withdrew the product within a few years despite the fact that, according to a leading US vaccine expert, “few, if any, scientists believe the evidence points to any substantive safety concerns”. But actual science was not part of the equation: bad press meant worse sales and the market to prevent Lyme—which has a group proclaiming Lyme to be an overlooked public health catastrophe that is every bit as intense and single-minded as the anti-vaccine crowd—suddenly disappeared. 

The FDA (full disclosure: I [article author Kent Sepkowitz, an infectious-disease specialist] have served as a member of an Advisory Committee to the FDA and admire their work) examined both the 21,000 people in the clinical trials and reports from the 1.4 million recipients of the vaccine given after approval. They found no difference in the clinical trials in rates of arthritis between those who received vaccine versus those who were given placebo. They also found a rate of arthritis in the 1.4 million recipients identical to the rate found in the general population. Surely this is the start of yet another screaming match.

#scienceeveryday  
Tom Eigelsbach Tom Eigelsbach

How do you get quickly the assembly output of a few lines of C? Yes, I know how to get the assembly dump of a .c file. I know how to do it, awkwardly, with a debugger... But since I have found out about http://gcc.godbolt.org/ I want to have an equivalent tool on the command line... That is, I want to be able to super quickly know the compiler output... by super quickly, I mean that I don't want to have to type complicated commands...
Daniel Lemire Daniel Lemire

Betsy McCall -
+11 - 5 shares - 1 comments


Betsy McCall Betsy McCall

Praveen Kulkarni - Brilliant!
+7 - 5 shares - 2 comments

Brilliant! 
Praveen Kulkarni Praveen Kulkarni

Found this on the information highway...
Matt Uebel Matt Uebel

Another turtle (this time a Box Turtle) found on the American Tobacco Trail while I was bicycling. This one is playing hide-and-seek. 
Karyn Traphagen Karyn Traphagen

Many hands make light work

"Wong-Foy, a senior research engineer at SRI, has built an army of magnetically steered workers to test the idea that “microrobots” could be a better way to assemble electronics components, or to build other small structures.

Wong-Foy’s robotic workers have already proved capable of building towers 30 centimeters (two feet) long from carbon rods, and other platforms able to support a kilogram of weight. The robots can work with glass, metal, wood, and electronic components. In one demonstration, they made a carbon truss structure with wires and colored LEDs mixed in to serve as the lab’s Christmas tree."

"Wong-Foy also thinks his approach might be useful for assembling devices that combine electronic and optical components, for example to interface with fiber optic cables. Because silicon and optical components can’t be processed in the same step, that industry often uses manual assembly to put them together. “In the field of optical electronics people have not found a good way to integrate indium phosphide lasers with silicon components,” says Wong-Foy. “The scale of those things is the size of carbon rods we’re using here.”

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/526601/microrobots-working-together-build-with-metal-glass-and-electronics/
Koen De Paus Koen De Paus

Chryle Elieff -
+11 - 1 shares - 2 comments


Chryle Elieff Chryle Elieff

Can't find the answer anywhere in Einstein's theories...
Jonathan Langdale Jonathan Langdale

Für viele Dinge ist das Leben wirklich einfach zu kurz! ;o)
Ciro Villa Ciro Villa

Fool me once shame on me fool me twice. ...I won't be fooled again. ...
Matt Uebel Matt Uebel

I didn't know this zombie claim had come back around. But Dr. Jen swats it back down. Hilariously, she is accused of being a tool of Big Lingerie in the comments by the book's author.
Mary Mangan Mary Mangan

Betsy McCall -
+8 - 2 shares - 2 comments


Betsy McCall Betsy McCall

Body mass index associated with breast cancer, regardless of body shape

A larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI, a new study of predominantly white women finds. The study fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer.

#breastcancer  
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

Genetic pre-disposition toward exercise and mental development may be linked

University of Missouri researchers have previously shown that a genetic pre-disposition to be more or less motivated to exercise exists. In a new study, Frank Booth, a professor in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, has found a potential link between the genetic pre-disposition for high levels of exercise motivation and the speed at which mental maturation occurs.
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

Bob Calder -
+1 - 5 comments


Bob Calder Bob Calder

Sea otters can get the flu.
Jason Goldman Jason Goldman

You know, because we can.

Here's a pic of a car on Mars driving, zapping, and drilling the surface, taken by an orbiter traveling overhead, that is then sent via radio waves to giant dishes on Earth that pick out the signal from the noise of the universe and put it on the web.

Look at that beautiful rover and those delicate tracks.

(More: http://www.uahirise.org/releases/msl-kimberley.php)
Ciro Villa Ciro Villa

Every now and then we are fortunate enough to come across some amazing exposure. Having got thoroughly lost we stumbled across this recumbent fold with fantastically displayed 'm' folds. Closer inspection reveals 's' folds, 'z' folds and parasitic folds. Our structural geologist had a wonderful time. 
Charles Carrigan Charles Carrigan

Oh, the joy of free speech unimpeded by intelligence and education.
#civilliberties 
Filippo Salustri Filippo Salustri

Google Previews New Designs for Its Modular Smartphones

Paul Eremenko, head of Project Ara, said two more developers conferences are planned for July and September of this year, and the first smartphones are expected to ship next January. Android will be updated in December, prior to the release of the phones, to support Ara's modular components.
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

For the Aww... of it!
Gail Barnes Gail Barnes

This is where I work.  This can be where you work, too!  Missouri University of Science and Technology is hiring a UI/UX designer for our new web team.  Use your psychic powers and design skills to help reimagine the university's web presence.  Be one of the few designers who can say their employer has a nuclear reactor!

Above all else we want to see an awesome portfolio.  Talent, taste, and love of the internet win the day.

Read on!  http://bit.ly/1qZ1qpf
Jaime George Jaime George

The emergence of herbivory

Scientists have discovered a transitional species that existed 300-million-year ago; the old fossilized juvenile skeleton of Eocasea martini is less than 20 cm long. Found in Kansas, it consists of a partial skull, most of the vertebral column, the pelvis and a hind limb.

"New research from the University of Toronto Mississauga demonstrates how carnivores transitioned into herbivores for the first time on land.

"The evolution of herbivory was revolutionary to life on land because it meant terrestrial vertebrates could directly access the vast resources provided by terrestrial plants," says paleontologist Robert Reisz, a professor in the Department of Biology. "These herbivores in turn became a major food resource for large land predators."

Previously unknown, the 300-million-year old fossilized juvenile skeleton of Eocasea martini is less than 20 cm long. Found in Kansas, it consists of a partial skull, most of the vertebral column, the pelvis and a hind limb.

By comparing the skeletal anatomy of related animals, Reisz and colleague Jörg Fröbisch of the Museum für Naturkunde and Humboldt-University in Berlin, discovered that Eocasea martini belonged to the caseid branch of the group Synapsid. This group, which includes early terrestrial herbivores and large top predators, ultimately evolved into modern living mammals."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-04-earliest-ancestor-herbivores.html#jCp

The study: Reisz RR, Fröbisch J (2014) The Oldest Caseid Synapsid from the Late Pennsylvanian of Kansas, and the Evolution of Herbivory in Terrestrial Vertebrates. PLoS ONE 9(4): e94518. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094518 . http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0094518

Image: The smallest and largest caseid: this is a reconstruction of 300-million-year-old tiny carnivorous Eocasea in the footprint of 270-million-year-old largest known herbivore of its time, Cotylorhynchus. Credit: Danielle Dufault
Ciro Villa Ciro Villa

Op ed in Education Week is out! Super happy to collaborate with the authors of Beyond Gifted Education: Scott Peters, Michael Matthews, Matt McBee, and Betsy McCoach.

"Students who are reading and writing at the college level should not be required to work on basic sentence structure. Those who are ready for calculus should not have to sit in an algebra class simply because that's what most people their age are doing. Such practices undermine student motivation and result in little academic growth.... [But] The truth is that "giftedness" is irrelevant to K-12 educational decisions. What is relevant is whether the instruction a child receives is sufficiently rigorous to challenge that child. When that is not the case, there are many potential causes."
Scott Barry Kaufman Scott Barry Kaufman

Here's a great timelapse video of the lunar eclipse

You know me, I'm a total sucker for timelapses. Here's a video by the amazing +Maxwell Palau of the recent lunar eclipse which he captured from a dark sky location in California. 

You can see how the moon gets chomped by the shadow and then turns red when it's completely covered by the Earth's shadow.

I was in flight when the eclipse began, but I was able to see most of it once I landed.

Did you get a chance to see the eclipse? 
Paul Drinnon Paul Drinnon

"But this is what purity culture does. This is the end result of fundamentalism. It makes you think that life gives you only two choices: either no kissing before marriage or a coked-out orgy in a strip club painted by Baphomet with the blood of innocent babies."

I love it when R.L Stollar just pours it all out there like this.....


Jonathan Langdale Jonathan Langdale

The Mental Life of Plants and Worms, Among Others: (by Oliver Sacks)

"[...] The magic ions, here, are sodium and potassium ions, which enabled the development of rapidly reacting muscle cells, nerve cells, and neuromodulation at synapses. These made possible organisms that could learn, profit by experience, judge, act, and finally think.

This new form of life—animal life—emerging perhaps 600 million years ago conferred great advantages, and transformed populations rapidly. In the so-called Cambrian explosion (datable with remarkable precision to 542 million years ago), a dozen or more new phyla, each with very different body plans, arose within the space of a million years or less—a geological eye-blink. The once peaceful pre-Cambrian seas were transformed into a jungle of hunters and hunted, newly mobile. And while some animals (like sponges) lost their nerve cells and regressed to a vegetative life, others, especially predators, evolved increasingly sophisticated sense organs, memories, and minds.

It is fascinating to think of Darwin, Romanes, and other biologists of their time searching for “mind,” “mental processes,” “intelligence,” even “consciousness” in primitive animals like jellyfish, and even in protozoa.  [...]"

#octopus   #intelligence   #consciousness  

Links below!
Wolfgang Alexander Moens Wolfgang Alexander Moens

Just got my first Nigerian scam on G+ 

My day is complete.
Bill DeWitt Bill DeWitt

Astronomy Papers That Caught My Eye In Today's arXiv

There are 52 papers today (Wednesday).

Topics: Superbubble N70, eLISA Expectations, Brown Dwarfs

Superbubble N70 http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3823 N70 (LHA 120-N-70) is a spherical object in the LMC with a diameter of about 350 light years. The team behind this paper looked at it in x-rays, optical, and radio (both new and archival observations), in an effort to understand how this object formed and what it is doing now. The conclude that it was not formed from a solo supernova event, but rather several events at roughly the same time from the same star-forming region. Other details about the origin and evolution are discussed.

eLISA Expectations http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3848 Te ESA's version of LISA (eLISA) is probably still a decade away from being launched, so while the team behind it makes the case for funding, the question is what will it be able to detect? The premise is that it should be good at detecting close-orbiting double compact objects. How many of these are close enough to be observed? Not many. For black holes (BH), neutron stars (NS), and white dwarfs (WD) orbiting with a period under 3 hours, our galaxy probably has 6 BH-BH, 3 BH-NS, 16 NS-NS, and 132 WD-NS pairs, and the WD-NS pairs might be fairly difficult for eLISA to tell from noise. This handful of signals will be very useful, but no one should expect a rich collection of sources from this early use of this new technology.

Brown Dwarfs http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3970 & http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.3896 There are maybe a hundred brown dwarfs which have been observed well enough to be able to use them to construct models of low-mass star behavior. One of these papers looks at the impact that Gaia will have on identifying thousands of nearby brown dwarfs, and the other looks at some recent discoveries of brown dwarfs in the Hyades and Coma Berenices. Both of these will contribute to better determining more precisely the mass/metalicity relationships for determining when an object fuses Hydrogen and when it doesn't.
Jay Cross Jay Cross

A Brief, Terrifying History of Viruses Escaping From Labs: How well-intentioned research with dangerous pathogens could put people at risk.

"[...] The danger of a manmade pandemic sparked by a laboratory escape is not hypothetical: One occurred in 1977, and it occurred because of concern that a natural pandemic was imminent. Many other laboratory escapes of high-consequence pathogens have occurred, resulting in transmission beyond laboratory personnel. Ironically, these laboratories were working with pathogens to prevent the very outbreaks they ultimately caused. For that reason, the tragic consequences have been called “self-fulfilling prophecies.” [...]"

#PANDEMIC   #VIRUS  

Links below!
Wolfgang Alexander Moens Wolfgang Alexander Moens

Does Richard Dawkins drive people to religion?
(Betteridge's Law applies here.)
#humanism  
Filippo Salustri Filippo Salustri

Have you ever used Chrome Remote Desktop to remotely access your computer from a different laptop or computer? Today that same functionality is coming to +Android phones & tablets with the Chrome Remote Desktop App for Android. Simply launch the app, select which computer you’d like to access, and start using it as if you were sitting in front of it. 

You can start setting up a computer for remote access by installing the Chrome Remote Desktop app from the Chrome Web Store: http://goo.gl/V9bJ9. And if you’d like to learn more about how to use Chrome Remote Desktop, you can check out these tips: http://goo.gl/7T58lk.
Ciro Villa Ciro Villa

www.all-about-psychology.com

Following on from the today in the history of psychology post. You can read "Safety and Efficacy of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide-Assisted Psychotherapy for Anxiety Associated With Life-threatening Diseases" (the first controlled trial of LSD in more than 40 years.) in full via the following link. 

http://journals.lww.com/jonmd/Documents/90000000.0-00001.pdf

#LSD #psychotherapy #anxiety
David Webb David Webb

Former Sequoia and Accel VCs launch Tracxn, a Bloomberg-like database for the startup world

With billions of dollars at stake, not to mention the egos of thousands of A-typers, it’s no wonder that people are trying to hack the startup investing process for a competitive edge. In what for years was an industry dominated by relationships and gut instinct, investors are now turning to big data to make smarter, more informed decisions.
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

Computer software analyzing facial expressions accurately predicts student test performance
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

On the verge

We are on the verge of a massive revolution in human knowledge, otherwise known as science.
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Jonathan Langdale Jonathan Langdale

Silver Surfer by Francesco Francavilla
Matt Uebel Matt Uebel

"In this interview, [NASA] mathematician Katherine G. Johnson talks about her early affinity for mathematics, a college professor who noticed her gift and pushed her to pursue advanced math courses and how she eventually became a NASA mathematician who calculated, among many other computations, the trajectory for the space flight of Alan Shepard, the first American in space; John Glenn, the first American to orbit earth; and Apollo 11, the first human mission to the moon. [...]"

#NASA   #MATH   #SPACE  

Links below!
Wolfgang Alexander Moens Wolfgang Alexander Moens

Betsy McCall -
+1 - 1 comments


Betsy McCall Betsy McCall

I LOVE MY FANS

Did you buy a copy of +Without Bloodshed yesterday, and help make my novel #2 in Amazon Cyberpunk? If so, THANK YOU!
mary Zeman mary Zeman

Origins of [Manufacturing] the Future | part1/2: The Great Debate @ASU
Lucas Glover Lucas Glover

Ciro Villa -
+1 - 1 comments


Ciro Villa Ciro Villa

Today's Earth Science Picture of the Day is a fantastic montage of the recent lunar eclipse, from fully illuminated to fully eclipsed & back again.  

#bloodmoon     #EPoD    
Charles Carrigan Charles Carrigan

NEW PHYSICS

Hey Standard Model, you're incomplete.  That's okay, we still love you.
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Jonathan Langdale Jonathan Langdale

Searching for dark energy with neutrons

With neutrons, scientists can now look for dark energy in the lab

Read more: http://urlc.fr/rwc8It

Caption: Neutrons between parallel plates can test hypothetical forces in the universe.

Credit: TU Vienna
Omar Loisel Omar Loisel

Betsy McCall -
- 1 comments


Betsy McCall Betsy McCall

This is a follow-up to https://plus.google.com/+AndresCaicedo0/posts/jMuP5DzfHow

The  proposal for a Q&A site for History of Science and Mathematics, as part of the StackExchange network, has just entered its second stage (Commitment).

http://area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/65204/history-of-science-and-mathematics/

If you feel to have such a site is worthwhile, please follow the link and commit.
Andres Caicedo Andres Caicedo

I have a new article on post-publication peer review in Neuron!

http://www.cell.com/neuron/abstract/S0896-6273%2814%2900288-8

Link below is the "behind the scenes" about the article.
Zen Faulkes Zen Faulkes

Please consider signing this petition if you support #lbgtrights  everywhere in the world.
Filippo Salustri Filippo Salustri

Pretty bird!
Gail Barnes Gail Barnes

This is a very funny and well crafted 4 minutes of as many pseudosciences, myths, conspiracy, pareidolia, and associated crankery that you can fit in that amount of time.

Via: http://www.reddit.com/r/skeptic/comments/236kpl/can_you_spot_all_the_pseudoscience_in_this_clip/
Mary Mangan Mary Mangan

Great, something to look forward to.
Betsy McCall Betsy McCall

We're all entrepreneurs...or so this article claims we should be. I find this to be quite true for research University faculty....Securing external funding, the promotion of one's ideas (research and teaching even), creation of a usable product...maybe this is the way forward from the stranglehold of multinational mega corporations...people need to own their own ideas, promote their own products..to own the means of production. 
Paul Minda Paul Minda

Could golf courses actually boost conservation?

There are 18,300 golf courses in the United States, encompassing some 2.7 million acres. University of Missouri, Colombia biologist Mark J. Mackey put it this way: “golf has become an appreciable portion of land use in the United States.” In a new paper recently published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning, Mackey and colleagues explain that understanding the impact of intensively groomed golf courses on the surrounding ecology isn’t as simple as “good” or “bad.” Instead, they argue that studies of golf course ecology should focus on particular target organisms, the so-called canaries in the golf course coal mine, whose responses to the altered ecology might help researchers to better understand the impacts of golf landscaping more broadly.
Jason Goldman Jason Goldman

Google, Microsoft, and Paypal are plotting to kill the password — the world’s most powerful companies want you to log in with fingerprints and eyescans 

http://bit.ly/1eLVme5
Greg Norcie Greg Norcie

A 19-year-old has been charged in the Heartbleed breach of the Canadian Revenue Agency
Ciro Villa Ciro Villa

During the Pleistocene, there were two ice sheets present in North America, the Cordillera and Laurentide sheets. It has long been presumed that the corridor between the two ice sheets opened and closed repeatedly during the Pleistocene. This ice free corridor was presumed to have opened around 13,000 years ago, allowing humans to travel down the corridor and enter North America. This model was associated with the idea that the initial settlement of the New World was done by the Clovis People. But, over the last 20 years, it has become clear that humans were in the New World prior to 13,000 years ago, which brings up the question of how they got here. Geologists went back up to Alberta to study the evidence for ice free corridor, using new dating techniques. 

The researchers concluded that the corridor was ice-free during most of the Pleistocene, with the  corridor only closing during around 20,000 years ago. But, the corridor also did not reopen until after 13,000 years ago. 

I'm not sure why people are so skeptical about a coastal route during the period between 20,000 and 13,000 years ago. Boat technology was clearly developed enough by that time period. The argument I heard as an undergrad was that the water was too cold, and if you fell into it, you would instantly be killed. But, water can't get below 32 F (0 C). It is physically impossible (if the water temperature drops below that, it becomes ice). And, I can't imagine it would have been any more of hazard than it is for Eskimos. The available evidence (archaeological, genetic and linguistic) I've seen seems to suggest that the first migrants into the Americas spread rapidly down the west coast. This would be consistent with a coastal migration.
Gail Barnes Gail Barnes

Google I/O To Elevate Focus On Design

For Google to win, it needs to attract the best designers to its team and get beautiful third-party apps built for its platforms. Yet right now it’s Google’s rival Apple and the iOS ecosystem that are known for their style. So this year, Google’s Jon Wiley tells me it’s “doing a really big push around design” at its 2014 I/O developer conference by adding sessions on Android UX, wearable app design, speech interfaces, and more.
Ward Plunet Ward Plunet

It was too cloudy in our neck of the woods to see much of anything in Tuesday's early morning sky—luckily,  NASA released a timelapse of the lunar eclipse.
Mindy Weisberger Mindy Weisberger

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